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Seble Frehywot, MD, MHSA
Online Learning Director

Whether she is working in Asia, Africa or the United States, Dr. Frehywot brings in-depth knowledge of comparative health systems, communities of practice (CoP), medicine, health policy, e-learning, and diaspora engagement to the challenges of building the components of a health system. Since joining GW SPH in 2007, Dr. Frehywot has been conducting research on the global health workforce, with concentration on the continent of Africa and Asia particularly on the capacities of medical doctors, non-physician clinicians and community health workers.

Currently, she is also the director of on-Line Training for the Atlantic Fellows fro Health Equity program. Recently, she served as the Principal Investigator (one of two) of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) Coordinating Center NIH/HRSA grant, which serves as the coordinating center for evaluation, technical assistance and communication in regards to increasing capacity, retention and conducting country relevant research to over 40 medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa and about 20 partnering medical schools in the U.S.A and Europe. Dr. Frehywot was Co-Principal Investigator for the Gates Foundation-Sub-Saharan African Medical Schools Study (SAMSS) Project, which was an in-depth site visit and survey study regarding the 169 medical schools in Sub-Saharan Africa on issues of capacity building, retention, and innovative practices. She has served as a WHO Technical Core Group member in the development of the World Health Organization's global guidelines/guidance related to health systems, namely the "Task-shifting Global Recommendation and Guidelines," the "Increasing Access to Health Workers in Remote and Rural Areas through Improved Retention," and future WHO guidelines on "Transformative Scaling-up of Medical and Nursing and Midwifery Education" and "Optimizing the Delivery of Key Interventions to attain MDG 4 and 5." She was also a Co-Principle Investigator on a Rockefeller Foundation study regarding developing a global framework for enumerating public health workforce and for inventorying public health training institutions. In prior positions, she has worked as principal investigator for grants from the United States government, provided technical HIV-related expertise to the Ethiopian government and conducted research and policy analysis on developmental delay disorders in children for the National Center for Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities at the CDC. Dr. Frehywot has published a number of papers related to health workforce and health systems as well as to the linkages with ICT. She teaches at The George Washington University both in an online and residential format the Global Comparative Health Systems, Global Health and Development and Global Public Health Culminated Experience courses.